Facebook Finds We Are More Tired After Daylight Savings

Facebook Finds We Are More Tired After Daylight Savings

Social media has been believed for some time to be something of a barometer on the human condition, and given the numbers in society that struggle every November and March when the time change occurs, it should come as no surprise that many of us were more tired than usual following the time change in March.  However, we are happier, strangely enough.

lead

 Every March, everyone around the world with a clock and who follows Daylight Savings Time has to spring their clocks ahead by one hour, effectively costing society one hour of sleep.  It’s been a tradition for decades, now, and effectively, it’s a psychological ploy, as we are still effectively getting up at the same time; we have simply only changed what our clock says.

At any rate, given society’s penchant for posting the everyday minutiae of their lives on Facebook, it should come as no surprise that we are commenting about how tired we are on the popular social media platform.  Delaware, in fact, saw a 231 percent increase in the numbers of people who were commenting how tired they were.  Facebook’s Data Science team did research into this phenomenon and questioned whether or not there was a marked difference of feeling happier or sadder around Daylight Savings Time.

Facebook’s Data Science team, however, saw a marked increase in people feeling better on Daylight Savings Time Monday.  There was a substantial number of people who listed their status as feeling happy or playful, for instance, and the Data Science team puts this down to something as simple as there being a warm sun shining for longer hours.

As a result of the number of Facebook users that have come out and acknowledged that they were feeling happier in spite of feeling more tired with the onset of Daylight Savings Time.  The numbers of people using “wonderful” to describe their mood that day – thanks to the mood icons recently integrated into Facebook’s profile pages – went up 21 percent when compared to other situations in the year.  By contrast, “bored” is down 14 percent and “annoyed” was down 12 percent.

It seems that people living in the northernmost states saw the greatest rises in their moods, which can likely be attributed to the longer days and the brighter sunlight as the days wear down.  In addition, while people are tired on Monday, they usually make up for things by the time they hit Thursday and are feeling brighter than they were Monday following Daylight Savings Time.

lead

Facebook has really become a barometer for our moods, and Daylight Savings Time is no exception.  Given how we all tend to live our lives out loud, Facebook has allowed us to express what we truly feel following our first few hours into Daylight Savings Time, and the psychology of Facebook, coupled with our ability to post what mood we now have, means that people are fairly easily able to pick up how events like Daylight Savings Time affects our mood via Facebook. Stay tuned for more Facebook news and don’t forget to share.